Posts

  • What Are Your Signals?

    I was recently in a one-on-one with a tech lead when we began talking about how his team was doing. His team had recently added one member and lost another, so the chemistry of the team was a topic that was on our minds. He mentioned how he felt the team was coming together, and I found myself asking a question that I’ve been reaching for a lot lately: “What are your signals?”

  • Angular Testing: Services

    Angular services serve as a way for us to store data that will be shared through our various Angular components. Services act as a single-point of truth for our application’s data, and as such they are often reused, sometimes heavily. Ensuring services are well-tested is a crucial part of maintaining a healthy Angular app.

  • Active Support Presence and the Single Line Method

    Ruby and Rails are both built to help us write concise, meaningful code. One pattern I constantly find myself writing is a method that returns one thing, if it exists, or a default value. This can work well upfront, but it takes a little more care if the case gets any more complex. Fortunately, Rails has just the trick to keep the more complex case nice and lean in its ActiveSupport gem.

  • AngularUI Router and Injecting $state vs $stateParams

    AngularUI Router is the de facto routing library in the Angular world. It takes the traditional routing mechanisms, and builds a subtle, but brilliant abstraction upon them. Instead of merely listening for requests at a set of URLs, it creates the concept of a set of states, each one configurable with an optional URL. This abstraction allows for flexibility when refactoring routes, but most interestingly, it creates the concept of a current state and stores key-value parameters of that state. Both the application’s state and state parameters are available for injection with $state and $stateParams respectively, although, as we’ll see, only one is necessary for injection in any given controller.

  • 'stringify_keys' Error on update_attributes

    Rails is a fantastic framework to develop with, but it can occasionally be unforgiving when it comes to error throwing. I was recently coding up a soft delete method in a model when Rails gave me the perplexing error: “Undefined Method `stringify_keys’”. I wasn’t calling stringify_keys anywhere in my method nor was it anywhere in my model. A grep through the app directory of the codebase came up empty as well, and I was stumped.

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